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Shrubs key role in future gardens highlighted in new book

Shrubs key role in future gardens highlighted in new book

A new book on the role shrubs can play in naturalistic planting schemes is being published this month. Written by naturalistic gardener Kevin Philip Williams and ecologist Michael Guidi, Shrouded in Light puts shrubs as key players for gardens amidst a changing climate due to their hardiness, adaptability and ability to thrive in arid conditions....

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HS2 gives first look at its largest ‘green bridge’

HS2 gives first look at its largest ‘green bridge’

Images of the largest ‘green bridge’ of the HS2 infrastructure project have been released. It’s one of 16 bridges of its kind that HS2 says, alongside five ‘green tunnels’, will bring together 33km2 of new wildlife habitats alongside the railway. The 99m-wide bridge will cross the high-speed railway close to the village of Turweston near...

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Rymer Trees eyes peat-free growth in third year

Rymer Trees eyes peat-free growth in third year

Suffolk-based nursery Rymer Trees has announced that it has “ambitious growth plans” for the year ahead. Founded just three years ago, the peat-free grower sees its third year of operation as a chance to expand. In December, the Plant Healthy certified nursery began sowing more than 30 tree and hedging species. It is aiming to produce around...

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The Garden Company’s James Scott to run half marathon for charity

The Garden Company’s James Scott to run half marathon for charity

James Scott is taking on the London Landmarks Half Marathon with his two daughters to raise money for Pancreatic Cancer UK. The managing director of The Garden Company – which was recently shortlisted for a Pro Landscaper Business Award – will be running the 13.1-mile event with 19-year-old Sophie and 17-year-old Lucy after his mother passed away...

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SoilsCon delivers wake-up call on soil health

SoilsCon delivers wake-up call on soil health

More than 150 landscape industry professionals attended SoilsCon 2024, where the critical importance of soil health to a functioning global environment was highlighted by its nine speakers. Returning after a four-year hiatus, the fifth soils conference drew in delegates from various sectors, including landscaping, landscape architecture, civil...

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Meet the women behind the Young People in Horticulture Association

Meet the women behind the Young People in Horticulture Association

It’s hard to believe that five years ago, the Young People in Horticulture Association (YPHA) didn’t exist. But since it was first founded at the start of 2020, it has grown to more than 800 members – that's hundreds in the horticulture industry who have joined a community of like-minded people.   And that’s exactly what Mollie Higginson and...

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5 things I wish I’d known when I became a garden designer

5 things I wish I’d known when I became a garden designer

Emma Tipping shares her experiences from starting out as a self-employed garden designer and what she wishes she'd known when she first embarked on her career. Last year I decided to take the plunge and become a freelance garden designer. I’d spent several years beforehand working as a gardener and had most recently been looking after a formal...

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Spring budget is a “missed opportunity,” says HTA chief executive

Spring budget is a “missed opportunity,” says HTA chief executive

This year’s Spring Statement does not reflect “the reality of those running businesses in environmental horticulture,” says Fran Barnes, chief executive of the Horticultural Trades Association (HTA). It was a “missed opportunity to act now” and boost a sector made up of mostly SMEs. Barnes added that the HTA is “disappointed” that Chancellor...

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Kew scientists use AI to predict the extinction risk of all plants

Kew scientists use AI to predict the extinction risk of all plants

The extinction risk of more than 300,000 plants has been predicted for a new study published today. A team of scientists at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew have used artificial intelligence to predict the risk for every known flowering plant, totalling 328,565 species. The research, published in the New Phytologist journal, can be used by scientists...

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